Roof Demolition

As you may remember, the original roofline of the house was very low. With a deceptively mild pitch (8′?) and no dormer, the usable space in all of the upstairs rooms was extremely limited. The mild pitch meant that the knee walls came pretty far into all of the rooms and made the remaining open floorspace feel claustrophobic, particularly since the ceilings were significantly below the peak of the roof (creating unusable attic space).

Ultimately, the plan for the roof is to “kick out” the back portion to create a dormer. This plan will allow us to drastically raise the ceiling height in the river-facing rooms. In addition to the dormer, we’re going to increase the roof pitch so that we can have even more livable space on the second floor, and the knee wall will be less invasive.

In addition to making the space more easily usable, the installation of a new metal roof will take care of some of the maintenance issues that were creeping up: leaks, various rodents taking up residence, etc. Also (!) we chose our new roof material (standing seam metal) so it could easily accommodate solar panels.

Even though there are so many things that will be improved by the new porch, it didn’t make the removal process any less intimidating.

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Inviting, right?

The crew used hand saws to remove the material between the rafters. They made much faster work of it than we would have with crowbars!

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Doesn’t everyone want a house where they can stand above and between their roof rafters? Here’s a short video to give you a different perspective. You can only hear slight panic in my voice!

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The next day, things got even more interesting. The crew pulled all of the rafters down and we were left with a blank slate.

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Oh, boy.

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It looks bleak, but the good news is that the crew quickly got to work constructing the new second floor walls, complete with their new pitch and dormer. Before that happened though, we spent one of our final “demolition weekends” taking down the final remaining piece of the old structure: the shed. That’s up next!

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